#27: The Female Buddha

This is from my good friend Cardelli’s apartment.

I was intrigued by the piece and asked what it was.

“It’s a female Buddha”

With my passion for  learning about religions, I was extremely surprised that I have never heard of her.

It’s kind of like Alanis Morissette playing God in Dogma.

But not really.

Either way this is what I found on the female interpretation of Buddha.

According to Wiki…

Tara (तारा) is a female Bodhisattva in Mahayana Buddhism who appears as a female Buddha in Vajrayana Buddhism. She is known as the “mother of liberation”, and represents the virtues of success in work and achievements. In Japan she is known as Tarani Bosatsu, and little-known as Tuoluo in Chinese Buddhism.

Tara is a tantric meditation deity whose practice is used by practitioners of the Tibetan branch of Vajrayana Buddhism to develop certain inner qualities and understand outer, inner and secret teachings about compassion and emptiness. Tara is actually the generic name for a set of Buddhas or bodhisattvas of similar aspect. These may more properly be understood as different aspects of the same quality, as bodhisattvas are often considered metaphoric for Buddhist virtues.

The most widely known forms of Tārā are:

  • Green Tārā, known as the Buddha of enlightened activity
  • White Tārā, also known for compassion, long life, healing and serenity; also known as The Wish-fulfilling Wheel, or Cintachakra
  • Red Tārā, of fierce aspect associated with magnetizing all good things
  • Black Tārā, associated with power
  • Yellow Tārā, associated with wealth and prosperity
  • Blue Tārā, associated with transmutation of anger
  • Cittamani Tārā, a form of Tārā widely practiced at the level of Highest Yoga Tantra in the Gelug School of Tibetan Buddhism, portrayed as green and often conflated with Green Tārā
  • Khadiravani Tārā (Tārā of the teak forest), who appeared to Nagarjuna in the Khadiravani forest of South India and who is sometimes referred to as the “22nd Tārā.”

There is also recognition in some schools of Buddhism of twenty-one Tārās. A practice text entitled “In Praise of the 21 Tārās”, is recited during the morning in all four sects of Tibetan Buddhism.

The main Tārā mantra is the same for Buddhists and Hindus alike: oṃ tāre tuttāre ture svāhā. It is pronounced by Tibetans and Buddhists who follow the Tibetan traditions as oṃ tāre tu tāre ture soha.

Definitely doing a line of paintings on the Tara’s.


 

 

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One thought on “#27: The Female Buddha

  1. There’s also an interesting story of Tara, how in a previous life she was female bodhisattva trying to attain enlightenment. Some monks told her if she’s lucky, she’ll come back as a man in the next life and help people. As the story goes, this didn’t sit well with her so she made a pledge to attain enlightenment as a woman and continue to take that form whenever she helped people

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